The Lonka Project is a photographic tribute to the last Holocaust survivors with us today.  Throughout 2019 some 250 of the world's leading professional photographers, in some 26 countries,  generously contributed their time and talent, each capturing a Holocaust survivor in the context that makes a unique and memorable statement about their lives. The result will be an artistic exhibition and a book. It will be launched in January 2020 marking the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

The last survivors of the Holocaust still live among us.

We photographers -  art, portrait and documentary - can do one last thing for them and for us.

We live in a time when the challenge of Holocaust remembrance grows in difficulty.

The new waves of anti-Semitism coupled with studies pointing to a lack of basic knowledge about the Holocaust across an entirely new generation attest to the urgent need for material to illustrate and to educate that darkest period of modern history.

The Lonka Project is an educational and artistic photographic collection created during 2019 that celebrates the resilience of Holocaust survivors and their power to live.

​For the photographers involved, this project will enable us to fulfill some of our goals and aspirations as memory keepers for those future generations who will never have known a Holocaust survivor.

Ruby Sosnowicz photographed by Mauricio Candela in Boca Raton, Florida

GOAL OF THE LONKA PROJECT

The body of work will form a traveling photographic exhibition to be inaugurated in 2020, commemorating the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Nazi death camps. It will be both a diverse, artistic exhibition as well as a major educational showcase.

 

A photo book will be printed in conjunction with the inaugural exhibition.

Ziv Koren photographs Holocaust survivors in his Tel Aviv studio. Each of the four were prisoners in Auschwitz.

 

The Lonka project was initiated In Jerusalem by Jim Hollander and Rina Castelnuovo as a tribute to Rina's mother Lonka, Dr. Eleonora Nass (1926-2018). As a girl, Lonka survived five Nazi concentration camps, and represents the Holocaust survivors' power to live.

We've watched the project evolve and grow into an international collaboration with so many enthusiastically contributing their talents. It continues and we continue to receive images from photographer as the project now almost celebrates it's first year. We began only in the middle of February 2019.

Below: Dr. Eleonora 'Lonka' Nass and her husband Dr.Jerzy Nass

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© 2020 The Lonka Project